Ethics integral to new MBA program at Milligan College


Photo Courtesy of Milligan College Dr. Bill Greer speaks to Milligan College students. Greer is the director of the new Masters in Business Administration program which matriculated its first class last month.

By Julie Fann
STAR STAFF
jfann@starhq.com

  
The director of the new Masters in Business Administration program at Milligan College says a focus on teaching business ethics and character to working professionals distinguishes it from other MBA programs. The school matriculated its first MBA class of 20 students on Valentine's Day weekend this year.
   "I think the most distinguishing element of the program is the fact that it is grounded and designed to teach business principles from the perspective that every business decision can be made ethically with character and integrity -- that there is no realm of business that is not touched by that fundamental principle. As a Christian institution, we believe that those elements are best conveyed from a Christian perspective," said Dr. William B. Greer, associate professor of business and economics.

Cole, students build for the future


Photo By Kristen Luther
The handiwork of EHS teacher Jim Cole and his diversified technology students can be found throughout the Elizabethton school system.

By Thomas Wilson
STAR STAFF
twilson@starhq.com

   From bookshelves to grandfather clocks, the handiwork of Elizabethton High School technology teacher Jim Cole and his students past and present can be seen around the city school system.
   Beyond the perceived notion of what was long called "shop class," Cole's class must incorporate math, engineering and sheer creativity to succeed.
   "People think wood class is just nailing wood together," said Cole. "It is considerably more than that."

Northeast State's Elizabethton campus reaches another enrollment milestone


Photo by Dave Boyd
"We're continuing to develop our Interactive TV course offerings," said C. Keith Young, director of Northeast State Technical Community College's Elizabethton campus.

By Greg Miller
STAR STAFF
gmiller@starhq.com

  
Northeast State Technical Community College's Elizabethton campus has reached another enrollment milestone.
   "At this site, this semester, we had another all-time high," said C. Keith Young, director. "We've continued to expand greatly, and we appreciate the support that Elizabethton and Carter County and the surrounding communities have provided for us. Our initial enrollment topped out at 540 students this semester (spring), which is about like a 9-1/2 percent increase from last year. We had almost 590 students for the fall semester, and that was just about our capacity.

Moody Aviation director: Missions not simply a job


Photo by Rick Harris
Moody Aviation students work on a small engine airplane as part of their training to become missionary pilots.

By Julie Fann
star staff
jfann@starhq.com

  
Moody Aviation, a flight instruction school for Christian missionaries which has been part of the Elizabethton community for 36 years, will close its doors in June 2005. Dan Gleason, director, said the hardest part about "saying goodbye" is the fact that missionary work isn't just a job -- it's a calling.
   "It's a process -- taking this news -- because I would say that there is no one here who sees this simply as a job. It's really a passion, and it's hard to respond well when you see that taken away. So I would say it's been much like the grieving process of losing a loved one," Gleason said.
   Moody faculty, staff and students have experienced a wide variety of emotions, from denial and disbelief to disappointment and sadness. "The good thing is that the school didn't close the day it was announced.

Some area ministers say lottery has spiritual implications


Photo by Dave Boyd
The Rev. Jim "Butch" Stout, pastor of Harmony Baptist Church, says the lottery "is wrong from the get-go. God can meet every need that we have. We donÕt need a lottery."

By Greg Miller
Star Staff
gmiller@starhq.com

   Some local ministers say the lottery has spiritual implications.
   Mr. Tim Ross, the minister at Hopwood Memorial Christian Church, said, "On what principles is the lottery based? Greed? Desire for more? Ill informed hope to hit the elusive jackpot? Who are the major winners in the lottery? The gambling industry that runs the show and parents who can afford to send their kids to college.
   "The lottery is just one more indication of our spiritual poverty, slavery to monied interests, and inability to look beyond short-term patches to values and actions that might lead to the betterment of our community and care for the most needy."

Plato Learning System proves successful


Photo by Dave Boyd
Happy Valley High School students work on the 30 wireless laptops available for use with the Plato Learning System.

By Lesley Jenkins
star staff
ljenkins@starhq.com

   New demands of No Child Left Behind have many schools looking at different programs to help at-risk students way before the time comes to cram for the NCLB exams. Carter County schools received extra help from the Plato Learning System, a research based computerized program with evidenced based practices.
   The Niswonger Foundation was generous enough to partner with the schools to make sure that the system was available to all Carter County high schools.
   Lee Ruffin, Plato administrator at Happy Valley High School, has enabled it to serve 87 students who then gained a credit through a review of the class through Gateway.
   The learning system is also used in a program to help students in danger of failing.

Adult education enrollment up 22 percent


Photo by Dave Boyd
Steve Souder instructs Adult Education Students.

By Julie Fann
star staff
jfann@starhq.com

  
The number of Carter County residents who are enrolled in adult education classes to obtain a GED degree increased by 22 percent from July 1, 2003 through the end of February 2004, according to Joyce Parsons, a paraprofessional with the Carter County Adult Education Program.
   "I think the biggest reason is the closing of industries in the area. People are losing their jobs, and they're finding out that in order to find a new job they have to get a GED," said Parsons, who, with paraprofessional Ruby Bowers, enrolls new students in the program and monitors progress.

Three chosen as teachers of the year


Amanda Colbaugh teaches her second grade students at Unaka Elementary School during the "Read Across America" which also coincides with Dr. Seuss' 100th birthday. Colbaugh and two other Carter County teachers received the teacher of the year awards.

By Lesley Jenkins
Star Staff
ljenkins@starhq.com

   Carter County school officials are pleased to announce three teachers of the year for the county. The winners, Amanda Colbaugh, Nancy Cox and Deani Smith, are in the running for regional teacher of the year.
   The winner of the regional competition, announced in early March, will be reviewed for the statewide teacher of the year and then to the national competition.
   Colbaugh, 38, was chosen as elementary school teacher of the year at Unaka Elementary School where she teaches second grade. She has been a teacher at Unaka Elementary for one year and previously taught at Hunter Elementary for 13 years. She is a graduate of East Tennessee State University.

Milligan College Institute for Servant Leadership to enhance school mission


Photo Courtesy of Milligan College Milligan College students Heather Kramer, April Martin and Megan Po (left to right) participate in a program developed by the schoolÕs new Institute for Servant Leadership. The school recently received a five-year $2 million grant to start the institute, designed to promote the collegeÕs Christian focus.

By Julie Fann
star staff
jfann@starhq.com

  
In August 2003, Milligan College officials announced the school secured a five-year $2 million grant from the Lilly Endowment for mission-centered initiatives. Awarded to approximately 88 colleges around the country, the funds are being used by Milligan staff to embellish the school's commitment to preparing students for Christian leadership.
   "What we're hoping to do with the Lilly Endowment dollars is really to build on what we've already had here at Milligan because we've been doing this for awhile in terms of trying to help people explore their calling. But with this infusion of dollars we can start different initiatives that help students branch out a bit," said Beth Anderson, who was hired as the program's director in July.
   During the fall, the college introduced new honors scholarships, campus life programming, spiritual life activities, enhancements to the curriculum, career counseling services, and leadership and service training opportunities with the grant money.

Third generation firefighter's faith sparks his desire to help others


When Jason Lowe (right) is not on the job with the Johnson City Fire Department, he may be putting in some hours working as a volunteer with the West Carter County Volunteer Fire Department (WCCVFD). Lowe was inspired by his father, Steve Lowe (also pictured), and his grandfather, the late Herb Hendrix, to become a firefighter. Jason and Steve are pictured holding a photograph of Jason's grandfather.

By Greg Miller
STAR STAFF
gmiller@starhq.com

   When Jason Lowe is not on the job with the Johnson City Fire Department, he may be putting in some hours working as a volunteer with the West Carter County Volunteer Fire Department (WCCVFD).
   Lowe's faith in the Lord Jesus Christ sparks his desire to help people through his work in both departments. "I think being a firefighter, first of all, is a gift from God," Lowe said. "I think it takes a certain person to fill that role, and I think that I was given that gift, the opportunity to serve God through the fire department and carry out His work through here by serving others.
   "That's something that I feel is real important in my job. I'm not only serving the citizens, but I'm serving the Lord at the same time. He gave me this job and put me in this place and gave me the abilities to do this job, and I'm going to do it the best I can and serve Him and the community.

Gouge very active in ministry of Big Spring Church of Christ


Photo by Dave Boyd
Kenneth Gouge is very active in the ministry of Big Spring Church of Christ, serving as a deacon, Sunday school superintendent, and song leader.

By Greg Miller
STAR STAFF
gmiller@starhq.com

  
Kenneth Gouge is very active in the ministry of Big Spring Church of Christ, serving as a deacon, Sunday school superintendent, and song leader.
   "I love to do the Lord's work," Gouge said. "I really do."
   As a deacon, Gouge serves on the church board. The board meets monthly, making decisions on a variety of matters, including upkeep of the church, missions, etc. As the song leader, he begins the services, leads the congregational singing, makes the announcements and calls for prayer.
   "As the Sunday school superintendent, I basically invite each person to stay for Sunday school," he said. "I make sure that the teachers are in the classes, and if they don't have a teacher, I fill in myself. It's kind of a big responsibility, but I'm there to do what I need to do for the Lord."
   Gouge says that he really became a dedicated Christian when his son, Brad, was killed in an automobile accident on April 13, 1996. "He was such a good kid, and he had just dedicated his life," Gouge said.

Roper ready for ECS challenges

By Thomas Wilson
STAR STAFF
twilson@starhq.com

   Like administrators around the nation, Elizabethton Director of Schools Dr. David Roper and his staff are wrestling with the federal No Child Left Behind law designed to increase accountability -- but not federal funding -- to local school districts.

Sylvan Learning Center offers tools for parents

From Staff Reports

   Sylvan Learning Center in Johnson City offers learning tools for parents to help children with many difficulties, including learning better math skills for solving word problems. According to a press release from the learning center, even students adept at math can struggle, and improving reading comprehension skills helps.

Lottery scholarship could boost Tennessee Tech Center enrollment

By Thomas Wilson
STAR STAFF
twilson@starhq.com

   A lottery scholarship funding tuition for technical school employees could give hundreds of Carter Countians and Tri-Cities residents the opportunity to learn new skills and seek new job opportunities for themselves.

School Board hopes to set major improvement plan in motion

By Lesley Jenkins
star staff
ljenkins@starhq.com

  
The Carter County School Board is ending a two-year study of the needs of the school system. The results point to the need of two schools and an addition to another.
   Director of Schools Dallas Williams and School Board Chairman Daniel Holder appeared before the Carter County Commission during the regular February meeting to tell commissioners of the new plans and to prepare them for a monetary request at the April 19 commission meeting.

ETSU receives largest charitable donations in school history

By Megan R. Harrell
Star Correspondent

   A lot has transpired at East Tennessee State University this past year. Changes have been made in the academic fabric of the institution, but history will remember this year as the year of the endowment at ETSU.
   The late James H. Quillen and the W.J. "Bill" Carrier family have endowed millions of dollars to ETSU for the establishment of scholarship funds for local students.

City schools have year of academic acgievement

By Thomas Wilson
STAR STAFF
twilson@starhq.com

   Elizabethton City Schools posted another year of academic achievement in 2003 Gateway exams with one innovative learning method paying dividends for two of the system's elementary schools.

Big changes come to some of ETSU's curriculum

By Megan R. Harrell
Star Correspondent

   Through the years East Tennessee State University has prided itself in filling the educational needs of students in the region. In keeping with the school's dedication to grow with demands in education, some changes have been made in two fields of study at ETSU.

TTC offers Spanish to employers serving Hispanics

The Tennessee Technology Center at Elizabethton is helping bridge the language barrier between Hispanics and businesses and government agencies in the Tri-Cities area.