From the desk of the Publisher:

A year has passed since the tragic events of Sept. 11, 2001 shook our nation, our community and our world. During this year, America has shown her true colors of strength, generosity and solidarity. As we recognize the anniversary of this sad day, we will honor those who lost their lives and support those whose lives were forever changed by the loss of a loved one.

One year later.........

Where were you and what were you doing on the morning of Sept. 11, 2001? As was the case when President John F. Kennedy was shot to death in November of 1963, people will never forget that terrible day. One year later, many of us are still trying to understand why the events of that day occurred. We are trying to find a way to deal with it so that we can bring closure to it and move on. But try as we may, it just won't go away. It never will.

Area fire departments say Sept. 11 increased awareness

By Julie Fann
star staff
jfann@starhq.com

  
Usually, we notice them only when we hear the sirens and see those red trucks barreling down city streets in response to an emergency. We quickly thank God it wasn't us and then resume our daily routines.

Elizabethton Fire Departement

EPD, sheriff's department still await homeland security funds

By Kathy Helms-Hughes
STAR STAFF
khughes@starhq.com

   Tennessee Gov. Don Sundquist in April signed into law a bill making $1.8 million available to strengthen the state's homeland security efforts.
   "The most important function of state government is to protect the lives of its citizens," according to Sundquist, who said the tragedy of the Sept. 11 attacks at the World Trade Center and Pentagon brought to the public's attention the need to improve various areas of the state's security.

Carter County Sheriff's Department, 2001

Carter County Rescue Squad sees little change since Sept. 11

By Megan Harrell
Star Staff
mharrell@starhq.com

  
During the hours following the Sept. 11 attacks it felt as though the nation had few places to turn to for security and even less for hope in the future. Then, stories of first responders' heroic acts began making their way across the country. Simply by doing their jobs, firefighters, EMS workers, and policemen and women offered Americans a fragile sense of pride and a glimmer of hope for humanity.

Carter County Rescue Squad

WTC attacks a wake-up call to nation's vulnerability

By Kathy Helms-Hughes

STAR STAFF
khughes@starhq.com

   At 8:46 a.m., Sept. 11, a commercial jet hijacked by al-Qaida terrorists slammed into New York's World Trade Center. Moments later, as the world watched in disbelief, another jet raced from the sky toward certain death, tearing through the concrete-and-steel fabric of the financial world's twin tower.

Sept. 11 prompted local relief efforts, fear of travel

By Julie Fann
star staff
jfann@starhq.com

  
On Sept. 11, 2001, America experienced its first attack on civilian soil since the war of 1812. Though some have compared Pearl Harbor to what happened in New York City, that event occurred on a military base, not on civilian territory.

Terror war brings FBI into new age of operation

By Thomas Wilson
STAR STAFF
twilson@starhq.com

   Almost one year removed from the terrorist attacks that felled the World Trade Center towers and blew a hole in the Pentagon, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) has new investigative powers, new agents and new priorities.

Task force coalesces East Tennessee law enforcement community

By Thomas Wilson
STAR STAFF
twilson@starhq.com

   The events of Sept. 11 have required law enforcement agencies from the FBI to the local sheriff's department to be prepared against future terrorist threats.
   The East Tennessee Task Force on Terrorism was created in October to streamline communications and provide a cohesion for local, state and federal law enforcement authorities in the region.

High school students brace for the future after Sept. 11

By Julie Fann
star staff
jfann@starhq.com

  
While the world goes about its business, whether at peace, or at war, high school students are still high school students. They make plans. They dream. They maintain hope for the future.

Media played important role during tragedy

By Megan R. Harrell

Star Staff
mharrell@starhq.com

   In the minutes and hours following the attacks on our nation on Sept. 11 one group of professionals did not have time to pause to take it all in. These people had to press on because the nation was counting on them for the most recent information, and it was their job to offer that information to the public as soon as it became available.

Local kids express feelings about terrorist attacks

By Julie Fann
star staff
jfann@starhq.com

  
Adults often assume children aren't paying attention when tragedy hits, especially if they aren't directly affected by it. However, local kids were greatly impacted by the events of Sept. 11, and they had no difficulty expressing their thoughts and feelings.

Sept. 11 had only temporary effect on religious faith

By Julie Fann
star staff
jfann@starhq.com

  
Despite talk that the events of Sept. 11 boosted church attendance and augmented spiritual growth in the nation, that trend was only temporary, according to national research and the opinion of a local pastor.

EMA finds new partners, new methods on emergency readiness

By Thomas Wilson
STAR STAFF
twilson@starhq.com

   While the chance of a terrorist attack in Carter County may seem very remote at best, emergency management officials are taking no chances.
   Federal grants to fund new equipment and a slew of emergency training courses have helped the local emergency management office prepare for an event the public hopes will never happen.

Anthrax scares continue to impact nation's post offices

By Megan Harrell
Star Staff
mharrell@starhq.com
 

   The first death from letters containing anthrax mailed via the United States Postal Service made news headlines the beginning of October 2001. Nearly one year later the effects of the anthrax scare are still being felt at post offices around the country, as confidence in the nation's oldest mail carrier slowly returns.

'The whole nature of airline travel will change'

By Thomas Wilson
STAR STAFF
twilson@starhq.com  
  
   The barriers have been removed.
   A 300-foot boundary that blocked vehicle traffic from coming near the terminal of Tri-Cities Regional Airport (TCRA) were removed months ago, according to the Federal Aviation Administration directive.

Star thanks high schools for entering Sept. 11 essay contest

The Elizabethton Star would like to say thank you to all area high school students who submitted their writing for the Sept. 11 essay contest. We enjoyed reading all of the essays and were impressed with the depth of feeling students had concerning the tragedy that occurred on that day.

The Power of One

By Kambli Owsley, senior
Hampton High School

   On Sept. 11, 2001, an unimaginable event occurred on United States soil. By hijacking four commercial airplanes, terrorists from the Middle East used American citizens as weapons. The attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon struck fear in Americans all over the country.

Part-time Patriotism

By Tessa Sammons, junior
Elizabethton High School

   As the economy of America rapidly deteriorated, Americans were getting restless and were beginning to question their government's operations. Traditionally, when the people have been unhappy, the majority party at the time was examined, and the opposing party began to win elections. Solutions, as well as scapegoats, are sought after.

Appreciation For Family

By Jessyca Newman, junior
Unaka High School

   The terrorist attacks of Sept. 11 left much of America with a void in their lives, and a sense of fear that something of this proportion could even conceivably happen in the United States.

Cultural Diversity

By Tara Hanson, senior
Cloudland High School

   "I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character." These are the famous words spoken by Dr. Martin Luther King.

Salvaging the positive

By Victoria Smith, junior
Happy Valley High School

   Sept. 11, 2001 shook our world on its foundation. With the first unforgettable anniversary rapidly approaching, we often juxtapose life before and after that fateful day. Even with our lives filled with adversity and turmoil, we were lucky to salvage some positive outcomes from such a horrific tragedy. One of these outcomes was a renewed faith in our country and in our government.